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Grain Access Control on Blogs to Reduce Hate SpeechHazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) for Hawaii

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose of the system: Everybody is allowed to express their conclusions and feelings effectively through online platforms. In many online platforms, many communities have emerged which include haters and racist people, who always try to criticize and spread hate among the social media platforms. So the main purposeTable of Contents

Introduction

Background

Literature Review

Theory

Emergency Management

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Preparedness

Nuclear Preparedness

Cold War Preparedness Plans

Response:

Recovery:

Mobile Alerts

False Alerts

Thesis state/purpose statement

Methodology

Analysis/Data Collection

Recommendations

Problems

During the disaster/ what to do

Limitations

Research Findings

Conclusion

References

Figures:

1: North Korea ballistic missile range potential

2: WEAs alert in Hawaii

3: WEAs study conducted testing public’s perception

4: Federal Civil Defense, Duck and Cover Pamphlet Photo

5:

Introduction

 Preparedness is the foundation for effective disaster management and response regardless of the hazard type. As the geopolitical environment changes, emergency managers are required to expand their conceptualization of risk and hazard to include potential nuclear security threats. “The United States, as the rest of the world, faces an increasing threat of attacks with weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Of these, the most feared are the nuclear threats” (Quirk, 2018). In 2017, North Korea launched 23 missiles including its for intercontinental missile (ICBM), “is a guided ballistic missile with a minimum range of 3,400 miles, it is primarily designed for nuclear weapons delivery”. On, November 29, 2017, North Korea claimed to have successfully tested a new type of ICBM topped with a super-large heavy warhead. On January 23, 2018, the CIA directed stated that North Koreas ever closer to being able to hold America at Risk”. The figure 1 depicts, North Korea advances in 2017, and it its believed their advances will be a threat by the end of 2018. ().  One way to start preparing a community for any type of threat, is by having a Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP). To be able to protect the citizens of the United States, hazard mitigation planning needs to be addressed and include all types of terrorist attacks, including nuclear weapons. In 2000, the Disaster Mitigation Act (DMA, 2000), was developed to focus on natural hazards, however the all-hazards approach has been adopted to cover a wider range of hazards including man-made, terrorism and hazardous material. Mitigation means reducing the loss of life and property, by reducing the impact a disaster has on the affected population,  when referring to terrorism, mitigation can also include preparedness and response efforts prior to an attack. (FEMA, 2003).

Figure 1, (Wang, 2017).

The purpose of this study is to examine Hawaii’s preparedness efforts prior to the events of 13 January 2018, when a false ballistic missile alert was issued by the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. Ballistic missiles, according to Rand Corporation, “are short-, medium-, and long-range rocket-propelled vehicles that deliver nuclear or conventional weapons” (2018). This research will explore the public’s perception of a nuclear attack and look at best practices to prepare and respond in the event of a nuclear attack.

Background

Hawaii was selected as the case for this study based on two main factors. First, its geographical location, especially in today’s geopolitical climate where the risk of nuclear attack is high. The geopolitical climate has become increasingly dangerous in the past few years. North Korea has increased their weapons testing, which has caused worry about a potential attack on American soil. Second, Hawaii is the only United States to ever experience an attacked by a foreign government. Due to this, the events that occurred on 13 January 2018 must be contextualized. This event will help define emergency management preparedness efforts in the state moving forward.

In 1898, Hawaii was annexed by the United States through the Newlands Resolution, in 1959, Hawaii became the 50th state, however, unlike all other states, the official language of Hawaii is not English, rather it is the Hawaiian language. Hawaii is the only state that is an island, which would put the state in a unique situation in the event of a nuclear attack, due to it’s geographic location. Hawaii has eight major islands with a population of approximately 1.43 million people; Oahu is the largest with approximately 953,000 people (World Population Review, 2017). Hawaii is at risk for many natural disasters, including by not limited to tsunamis, hurricanes, and volcanic eruptions. Hawaii is also a target for manmade disasters; it is a potential target for a ballistic missile attack because, Hawaii is uniquely situated in the Pacific Ocean and is a strategic location for US Military operations for all of Asia. “Hawaii is home to the Pacific Command (PACOM) and would likely serve as an important staging area for American forces in the Pacific in the event of greater hostilities breaking out. Hawaii has played that role in every major conflict since the island nation was annexed by the United States in 1898” (Civil Beat, 2018). With North Korea expanding its nuclear capabilities and the tension between the United States and North Korea, it is critical to have an established response plan for a nuclear attack. Even so, “Hawaii, for all its beauty, is a relatively poor location to experience a nuclear strike. Its isolation offers little chance for swift evacuation and would likely complicate government efforts to provide medicine and food relief. Its prevailing high winds could have an unpredictable effect on the dispersal of radiation. Yet there is much that government officials could do that might reduce panic before a strike and hardship afterwards” (Tucker, 2018).

Hawaii’s history also plays an important role into why it was chosen as the subject of this research. Hawaii was attacked on December 7, 1941, when the Japanese launched an attack on Pearl Harbor, a United States Military base in Honolulu, Hawaii. The attack destroyed 20 ships and 300 airplanes and left 2,403 people dead and 1,000 wounded. Hawaii is located approximately 2200 miles away from the continental United States, which makes it more vulnerable to attacks and increases response time for resources from the mainland in the event that it is attacked.

A black sign with white text

Description generated with high confidenceOn January 13, 2018, the state of Hawaii was running a drill with its Emergency Management Department, an incident occurred when an employee mistook the drill for a real event. The employee sent out a text message notification that went out to all citizens and read, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL” (Berman and Fung, 2018). Many people were confused by this text message because it occurred during the drill. This also created challenges for the Emergency Management Department because, there was no notification that could be sent out immediately after to rescind the statement. Thirty-eight minutes passed before a notification was sent out saying it was a false alarm and there was not actually a ballistic missile inbound.

Figure 2 (Begnaud, 2018)

In recent history, nuclear security and threats have surfaced, especially after t 9/11 and Iran’s testing of nuclear weapons. North Korea has also shown its potential of nuclear capabilities that has led many people to be concerned. However, the last time citizens prepared for a nuclear attack was during the Cold War. The end of the Cold War “produced a false sense of security. Peace has yet to be attained…The stark realization that rogue states, and quite possibly terrorist groups, are capable of obtaining weapons of mass destruction, nuclear and otherwise, in response to U.S. foreign policy actions presents an even greater dilemma today” (DeBenedetti/Charles F. Howlett, 2009, p. 437). Therefore, it is even more important to put plans in place and help the public prepare for as potential nuclear attack. Having the proper steps documented will help to ease confusion and could save more lives if the attack does occur. While the Cold War officially ended in the early 1990s, the threat never truly left.

Literature Review

Emergency Management

An office, individual, or group of individuals focusing on emergency management are important for communities. It allows for community development, which can help increase community resilience in the face of a disaster. There are four phases of emergency management that are cycled through for any disaster: Mitigation, Preparedness, Response and Recovery. These four phases are critical because they all play a key role in improving the livelihood of the community. Emergency managers face threats in their communities every day. They must prepare for the worst-case situations before they happen. In order to do this, they must find the “most effective public warnings to issue during a hazardous environmental event” which can be complicated (Cova et al., 2016). There are various questions that must be asked, with three primary ones; “Who should take protective action? What is the best action? and When should this action be initiated?” (Cova et al., 2016).

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Hazard mitigation plays an important role in reducing societal losses from natural and man-made hazards. Many hazardous events are not preventable, however, when hazard mitigation planning is used it can reduce economic and personal losses, and enhance community resilience (Frazier, Walker, Kumari & Thompson, 2013).  While hazard mitigation planning is he first step to increasing preparedness and resiliency while decreasing vulnerability, there are various reasons communities do not address all the criteria that could help them in the future. The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, has minimum requirements that are needed to qualify for a Federal Mitigation Grant, regardless of plan quality or if the Hazard mitigation plans applies to local hazards and risks. Emergency managers at the local level face constraints when working to include the HMPs into their locality’s comprehensive plans while trying to provide funding and focus on both the plans equally (Frazier, Walker, Kumari & Thompson, 2013). It is important to have a high-quality plan focused on the local community. The HMP should include standard hazards, but it needs to be targeted to the hazards that affect their geographic location specifically.  Hazard Mitigation Plans are the first line of defense to any hazard by providing direction to preparing for an event before it happens. Having high quality, location-specific plans increase resiliency within the community, and improves mitigation which can decrease the loss of life and reduce economic impact a disaster can have on a community.

Preparedness

Preparedness is the second phase in Emergency Management. Preparedness is important because it could potentially help save lives and property if a proper plan is in place before an incident occurs. Not all preparedness efforts should look the same; each preparedness plan needs to be tailored to the region and hazards that may impact that area (FEMA, 2003). Not only should they include natural hazards, terrorism because it’s a global threat, but preparedness plans must also include threats from state actors. The United States “faces the distinct possibility of a catastrophic terrorist attack using an improvised nuclear device (IND), according to international and U.S. intelligence” (Jenkins, 2008). In the event of a detonation in a major United States city, the result would be a catastrophic number of victims. The IND detonation would overwhelm emergency response, healthcare systems, and public health, while increasing social and economic challenges with the tens of thousands to possibly hundreds of thousands of victims. While the likelihood of an IND detonation may not seem realistic, proper planning and decision making prior to an event occurring (Davis, Reeve, Altevogt, 2013).

Nuclear Preparedness

Any nuclear attack will have a catastrophic impact on a society making nuclear preparedness a critical aspect of emergency management. As emergency managers, it is our job to protect the public. In order to do this, appropriate action need to be taken based on the hazard. “Protecting the public from an airborne hazardous chemical release requires that appropriate protective actions be selected quickly. When deciding whether to recommend evacuation or shelter-in-place, decision makers must weigh the interaction of numerous factors that characterize the release, the meteorological conditions, and the populations that may be affected” (Sorensen, Shumpert, and Vogt, 2004).

Many regions have nuclear preparedness in their hazard mitigation plans. Guam is one of those locations that prepare their citizens in the event of a nuclear attack. Over the last year, Guam has given out pamphlets in the community, so people can have an idea of what to do in the event of a nuclear attack. Education, preparation and practice can make a difference between life and death in an emergency. Guam’s joint information center has released pamphlets about what to do in the event of a ballistic missile attack. It talks about preparing before an event would occur; by building an emergency supply kit, having a family emergency plan, and making a list of potential shelters, which contains a concrete barrier (Guam homeland security, 2017).

Figure 3, (Hubbard, 2018)

Cold War Preparedness Plans

Cold War preparedness plans can give us a great understanding of what nuclear preparedness looked like in the height of nuclear tension. One of the most influential documents was “Duck and Cover”, which was accompanied by a pamphlet that was shown to the public in the 1950s. “Duck and Cover” was created by the United States Federal Government, and was distributed by A close up of text on a black background

Description generated with very high confidenceFederal Civil Defense Administration (FCDA), an organization that held the role of what the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) does today. During this time period nuclear security was at a heightened risk and many people were very fearful of a nuclear attack. The production of “Duck and Cover” was due to “the massive, sometimes hysterical, response on the part of the people and the government of the United States to the Soviet Union’s acquisition of nuclear weapons and the first Soviet test detonation in late 1949. If the Soviets were to attack without warning, the children would need to know what steps to take to survive” (Jacobs, 2010). The main goal of “Duck and Cover” was to teach children how to survive without adult assistance. “Duck and Cover” was created by Archer Films under a contract with the FCDA and was shown in thousands of schools across the United States with the companion pamphlet distributed to millions of individuals (Jacobs, 2010). The film had a cartoon mascot, Bert the Turtle, and a catchy song written by the same team whose jingle had advised Americans to “See the USA in a Chevrolet” to capture the attention of the audience (Jacobs, 2010). Preparing children for a nuclear attack was important to many people, and as historian Michael Scheibach notes, “educators, government officials, and parents realized the necessity, even the urgency, of preparing the country’s youth for a new, more precarious world” (Jacobs, 2010). In the event that parents weren’t present with their children during the nuclear attack, they the government, organized a way to identify their bodies. Starting in 1951, private and public schools in San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia, and New York City issued dog tags to students. Over 2.5 million tags were issued so that in the event of a nuclear attack children could be identified and reunited with their families. FCDA education experts considered, tattoos, marking of clothes, and fingerprinting, however, dog tags are made of heat and corrosion resistant metal, so they believed this would be the better choice to help identify bodies after the nuclear attack (Jacobs, 2010). The experience that parents and children had during the Cold War were very different, “while adults perceived a threat to the American way of life–to their health and wellbeing and those of their families–their children learned to fear the loss of a future they could grow into and inhabit. These kids of the Atomic Age wondered if they might be the last children on Earth” (Jacobs, 2010).

Impact

In the late 1970s, journalist Michael Carey teamed up with psychiatrist Robery Jay Lifton to collect an oral history from adults who experienced nuclear fears while they were growing up. In 1982, an edition of “The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists” (not sure if quotes or Italics-APA check), the results of these interviews were released. Throughout the interviews, the researchers found that the nuclear scare left a permanent mark on the Baby Boomer generation. Personal recollections were shared and “One respondent from Philadelphia remembered that when, as a youngster, he had been told the United States was a melting pot, one of [his] thoughts was, ‘It really will be a melting pot’ because of that business with the bomb” (Need Citation for quote). Carey himself recounted growing up in Fairbanks, Alaska near a Strategic Air Command Base that was busy with the influx of bombers laden with nuclear weapons. He shared, “My school had unsettling air raid drills, but I recall more vividly my terror of the citywide blackouts, when we had to cover our windows with blankets to ensure no enemy could find Fairbanks. I was curious about the bases by day but frightened of the bomb at night” (Jacobs, 2010).Another of Carey’s respondents recalled seeing film footage of civil defense experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site when he was a child. One of these showed the famous explosion of House One (“Test Shot Annie,” conducted on March 17, 1953). “The thought of a building bursting into flames in that way,” explained the respondent, “is kind of startling…It undercuts the sense of reality. You kind of grow up knowing that certain things are stable…that certain presuppositions about the way things are remain constant. Namely, buildings stand. They may burn down[,] or[,] let’s say in an earthquake, they might collapse, but reality is fairly stable. When you suddenly see a picture like that, it’s kind of like getting the rug pulled out.” Another respondent told Carey of a terrifying moment in his childhood in California in the 1950s. He heard a missile test being conducted at one of the many military bases in the area, and he believed that an actual nuclear explosion was in progress. “He dived behind the couch, yelling ‘Get down! It’s happened!’ only to discover that he had made a fool of himself.” In his book on the 1960s, the historian Todd Gitlin recounts a particularly disturbing practice in his grade school: “Every so often, out of the blue, a teacher would pause in the middle of class and call out, ‘Take cover!’ We knew, then, to scramble under our miniature desks and to stay there, cramped, heads folded under our arms, until the teacher called out, ‘All clear!’” (Jacobs, 2010). Children recall memories about growing up in the 1950s, “In 1981Albert Furtwangler, a professor of English, recalled growing up in the early 1950s in Seattle: “In fifth and sixth grades, I also dressed every morning with a bit of cold metal against my chest—a dog tag with my name and address, furnished at cost by the Parent-Teacher Association.” The military-style tags served to further signify to American children that they were soldiers in the Cold War” (Jacobs, 2010).

Response:

“Response includes actions taken to provide emergency assistance, save lives, minimize property damage, and speed recovery immediately following a disaster” (FEMA, 2003).

Recovery:

“Recovery includes actions taken to return to a normal or improved operating condition following a disaster” (FEMA, 2003).

Mobile Alerts

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protective

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customization in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protect ive

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customisation in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protect ive

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customisation in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system.

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protect ive

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customisation in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system

You list Twitter first but then discuss WEA. This is an example of where you need to have parallel construction of the paragraph and thoughts. You also need to divide this into multiple paragraphs to define the different ideas discussed in the section.

You don’t receive WEAs as part of the HMP. You receive alerts as part of response. However, the implementation of an early alerting system typically a mitigation measure.  You need to fix this sentence. You are mixing two unrelated ideas.  This section as a whole lacks clarity.

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protective

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customization in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protect ive

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customisation in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protect ive

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customisation in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system.

A WEA resembles a text message and indicates the

hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protect ive

action that recipients should take and the agency issu-

ing the alert in a standard order and format. However,

WEAs differ from traditional text messages in that

they are geo-targeted and distributed through a wire-

less channel that remains unaffected during times of

network congestion. WEAs also are not counted

towards texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan,

are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited

to 90 characters and are accompa nied by a distinctive

tone and vibration, both repeated twice. Furthermore,

WEAs for imminen t threats, such as rapid-onset ter-

rorism incidents, are an opt-out only system. WEAs

are thus intended as a kind of first alert or warning

siren in your pocket (FEMA, 2014).

Twitter can be especially effective for imminen t

threat alerts because of its short length (140 charac-

ters), ability to immediately alert users to new mes-

sages and capability to be accessed from mobile

devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven,

2013). Unlike WEAs , tweets are not geographically

targeted. Also, compared to WE As, imminent threat

tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow

for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying

and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in

and (3) Twitter allows for user customisation in that

audible tones and other functions can be tailored to

user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar

alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that

Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the

WEA system

Mobile alerts via Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) and Twitter are very common in today’s world for a variety of events and emergencies. While it is very common for individuals to receive a WEA based on their community’s response plan. The implementation of the alerting system is a mitigation measure. A Wireless Emergency Alert may be the fastest way to receive information because “a WEA resembles a text message and indicates the hazard, the time and location of the alert, a protective action that recipients should take and the agency issuing the alert in a standard order and format” (Bean, et al., 2016).  Two things separate WEAs from standard text messages, they are geo-targeted and sent through a specific wireless channel. By being geo-targeted, WEAs can be sent to individuals in a target a region and send out information only to any phones that ping off the cellphone towers within the set vicinity. By using a specific wireless channel, messages can be sent and unaffected even when networks are congested to ensure the messages are received in a timely manner.

WEAs are intended as a “kind of first alert or warning siren in your pocket” (FEMA, 2014; Bean, et al., 2016). This is because, “WEAs also are not part of texting limits on a recipient’s wireless plan, are uniquely displayed on a device’s screen, are limited to 90 characters, and are accompanied by a distinctive tone and vibration that are both repeated twice. Furthermore, WEAs for imminent threats, such as rapid-onset terrorism incidents, are an opt-out only system” (Bean, et al., 2016). All of these aspects of WEAs mean that unless the recipient has specifically opted out of the alert system, they will receive the notification and be informed of the imminent danger or threat. The other notification system that is commonly used is Twitter which can be beneficial because “of its short length (140 characters), ability to immediately alert users to new messages and capability to be accessed from mobile devices (Choi, 2012; van der Meer & Verhoeven, 2013). Unlike WEAs, “tweets are not geographically targeted unless specifically tagged. Additionally, compared to WEAs, imminent threat tweets have several distinct features: (1) tweets allow for interaction with receivers through the ‘@’ replying and direct messaging functions, (2) tweets are opt-in and (3) Twitter allows for user customization in that audible tones and other functions can be tailored to user preferences. Finally, Twitter is a more familiar alerting platform among U.S. audiences given that Twitter was launched in 2006, six years before the WEA system” (Bean, et al., 2016).

Figure 4, (Bean et al, 2016)

In a 2016 study by Bean et al., the researchers conducted a study on how audiences would interpret a mobile alert for a unfamiliar hazard. They used four focus groups using an improvised nuclear device as the scenario. The study found that “While participants offered a wide variety of interpretations, WEAs and tweets were deemed confusing, difficult to believe and impersonal. Participants also consistently found WEAs and tweets to be fear inducing and uninformative. The findings compel improvements in the way that WEAs and tweets are currently written, as well as indicate future directions for applied risk and crisis communication theory development.

12-18 year old’s participated in, “scenarios relating to flooding and the discovery of an unexploded World War Two bomb and were shown example alerts that might be sent out in these circumstances. Intended compliance with alerts was high. Participants noted that compliance would be more likely if: they were familiar with the system; the messages were sent by a trusted source; messages were reserved for serious incidents; multiple messages were sent; messages were kept short and formal” (Wong, Jones, and Rubin, 2017).

False Alerts

When thinking about the impact of a false alarm, one must also consider how the public is going to respond if another alert goes out in the future. The next time an alert goes out, many people may not think they can rely on the accuracy of the government and may not respond in time. A case study by Ripberger et, al. found that, “subjective perceptions are—in part—a function of objective experience, knowledge, and demographic characteristics. When considered in tandem, these findings support the proposition that errors influence perceptions about the accuracy of warning systems, which in turn impact the credibility that people assign to information provided by systems and, ultimately, public decisions about how to respond when warnings are issued” (Ripberger et. al., 2015).

However, in air traffic controllers, the study by Wickens et al, found that the employees will still respond in the event of a false alarm.   “Although centers with more false alerts contributed to more nonresponses, there was no evidence that these were nonresponses to true alerts or that response times were delayed in those centers. Instead, controllers showed desirable anticipatory behavior by issuing trajectory changes prior to the alert. Those trajectory pairs whose conflicts were more difficult to visualize induced more reliance on, and less compliance with, the alerting system. Conclusion: The high false-alarm rate does not appear to induce cry wolf behavior in the context of en route ATC conflict alerts” (Wickens et,al., 2009). (Paraphrase)

Thesis state/purpose statement

The goal of this research is to bring attention to nuclear security as it is a national threat, especially in today’s geopolitical climate. Hawaii is the focus of this study due to the limited resources they have in the event of a ballistic missile or nuclear attack. The goal of this research is to better understand what other states and territories do to prepare for nuclear attacks to suggest ways that could better assist Hawaii’s public in the event of a nuclear attack.

Methodology

Preparedness is the first step to a problem, especially when it comes to nuclear security. With the increasing global focus on the use of Nuclear power, it is now even more important to have a preparedness plan in place in the event of a nuclear detonation, even if it is an accident. Hawaii has come into the spotlight due to the recent mishandling of a nuclear exercise that left millions of people panicked for 38 minutes when they received a text notification that a ballistic missile was inbound, and they needed to take immediate shelter. The purpose of this research is to examine Hawaii’s preparedness efforts prior to the events of 13 January 201 due to the limited resources they may have to respond in the event of an inbound ballistic missile. The research goal is to better understand commonalities among other states and territories, using this could better assist Hawaii in the event of a nuclear attack.

The following research questions will guide this process:

  1. Looking at newspaper and media reports of the false alarm, how does the public view an emergency manager’s role in a nuclear attack?
    1. How does fear come into play for public perception?
  2. What is Hawaii’s current Hazard Mitigation Plan?
    1. What does it say about nuclear planning?
  3. In the event of a nuclear attack, does Hawaii have the necessary resources to respond?
    1. What is a realistic plan for Hawaii?

The research was conducted using a qualitative approach to allow for a understanding of emergency management efforts for nuclear security. The research study focuses on qualitative data that was collected using newspaper reports and primary government documents. A condition was that the newspapers had to be produced in Hawaii which allowed for a local perspective on the missile alert that went out. Any newspapers that fell outside of that criteria were discarded. Primary local, state, and federal Government documents will allow for a comprehensive understanding of preparedness and situational awareness that exists in Hawaii.

Zoe you need to align this with the goal…once you finalize that.

Be careful with this statement. You used one method and limited articles – you can’t say it was comprehensive.

Analysis/Data Collection

Local Newspapers

The Hawaii newspapers were found using Georgetown library online database. Specifically using ProQuest Centrals platform and search Hawaii missile alert. The articles were there narrowed down by geographical location and then date in which the articles were published. The top 50 sources were looked at, even with specifying the region, many sources had to be pulled out due to the articles not being in Hawaii. The top 24 news articles were used for this analysis, the only news source being Honolulu Star- Advertiser. After the articles were found, they were coded using NVivo software. The articles were run through NVivo automatic software which codes themes within each newspaper. The picture is attached on the right of the findings. Three major themes were found within the 24 articles: Missile, Alert, and Emergency.

Continental United States Newspapers

The newspapers used for this research were found using ProQuest centrals platform. The terms searched were Hawaii missile alert, articles were then narrowed down by language (English), region needing to be in the United States. A total of 17 articles were selected and coded using NVivo. The articles went through NVivos automatic software coder the top three themes were Alert, Missile, and Emergency. The themes that were found are pictured to the right.

Hawaii Hazard Mitigation Plan

Hawaii’s hazard mitigation plan is quite extensive, while there is nothing specifically on a nuclear attack or an attack from another government, it does cover bioterrorism. The hazards that is does plan for (pictured on the right) can have valuable resources that could be used for a nuclear attack. Hawaii does have emergency shelters in place if they would need one, however in the County and city of Honolulu they only have shelter space for 30% of their population. There is also a lack of emergency shelter space on other islands, however in 2005, they did allocate $4 million dollars to retrofit shelters. The plan also includes what hospitals are in which cities. They also use GIS technology in order to see what capabilities they may still have left after a natural disaster.

Figure 5, (Hawaii State, 2013)

As new threats emerge we must prepare for them by engaging the public and having a strong hazard mitigation plan. “Manmade hazards such as terrorism and technological disasters—has become all too apparent, as demonstrated by the September 11, 2001 attacks on New York City and Washington, DC and the July 2001 hazardous material train derailment and fire in Baltimore, Maryland. Additionally, the 2001 anthrax attacks, the 1996 bombing at the summer Olympics in Atlanta, the 1995 destruction of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, and scores of smaller-scale incidents and accidents reinforce the need for communities to reduce their vulnerability to future terrorist acts and technological disasters” (FEMA, 2003). The 2013 Hazard mitigation plan also establishes how tourism and lifelines are 100% dependent on maritime shipping. If someone were to target shipping docks, then this could cut off access to food, water, and supplies for days or weeks. The two charts represent the major events that have occurred within the united states since 1993. The top chart (in black), represents the method of weapon that was chosen, it also shows how many people were injured and killed. The Chart below, breaks down the time period these events occurred. This is important because it shows that preparedness is important because one never knows when a hazard may present itself.

Guam:

Guam has an extensive hazard mitigation plan; however, it also doesn’t include an attack by a foreign government. However, the local emergency management has issued pamphlets to their citizens in the event of a nuclear attack.

Preparedness

In schools, there are monthly or quarterly tornado drills in many communities, in the event of a tornado. Students and teachers know what to do if the tornado sirens go off. Practice builds muscle memory, this allows for faster response time.

Unattended consequences- > emergency response drill, alert, information given, how do we take this all hazards approach, need to stop and listen.

Responsibility

The responsibility of a nuclear alert has been resting with local emergency mangers in Hawaii. However, due to the recent false missile alert that went out on January 13, 2018, Senator Brian Schatz has stated a missile attack should be a federal responsibility. Schatz stated, “a missile attack is not a local responsibility. Confirmation and notification of something like a missile attack should reside with the agency that knows first and knows for sure. In other words, the people who know should be the people who tell us. That is why I’m introducing legislation with Sens. Harris, Gardner and others to make it clear that the authority to send missile alerts should rest with the Department of Defense and Homeland Security. These agencies have to work with the state and local Emergency Management Agencies when they get the word out so that the public is safe and informed” (Nakso, 2018). The lag in time that it takes to communicate with local authorities to inform the public, could be seconds that count for their safety in an emergency. During the cold war, the responsibility laid with the federal government, they released information to the public about how to prepare for a nuclear attack. Shelters were established, Duck and Cover went out to the school children and many families had their own fallout shelters.

Recommendations

Preparing for a nuclear crisis is immensely difficult because there a various factors that come into play; where the detonation is, the wind speed, food contamination, medical and recovery. “A nuclear blast would all but certainly contaminate local food and water sources. This would present a particular hardship for Hawaii, given its isolation. Still, the danger would wane after six to eight weeks for most food and slightly longer for milk. (Fallout can contaminate large areas of grazing pasture and then concentrate in the milk of the cows that ingest it” (Tucker, 2018).

Medical needs have to be analyzed; however the radiation fallout could make that difficult. “A recent Institute of Medicine report looked at the nation’s ability to respond to the medical needs that would arise following a terrorist nuclear event and found preparedness is sorely lacking. “The report provides a frightening but candid look into our level of preparedness today,” wrote APHA Executive Director Georges C. Benjamin, MD, FACP, FACEP (E), in the report preface as chair of its authoring committee” (Currie, 2009).

Problems

Funding to help prevent a nuclear attack could become an issue, “in 2002, the President of the United States directed the Department of Defense (DOD) to field an integrated, interconnected, and layered Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) capable of defending the U.S. homeland, deployed troops, friends, and allies against ballistic missiles of all ranges in all phases of flight. DOD has spent over $80 billion to develop the BMDS, and since its initial fielding has added additional capabilities. Since there is limited time available to intercept an incoming missile, integrating training among all organizations involved is essential to connect the seams where the commands and services must work together. However, DOD recognizes that funding for training will face significant budget pressures amid the department’s competing demands for current operations, acquisitions, and personnel expenses. The BMDS is comprised of various land- and sea-based elements,1 including radars, interceptors,2 and command and control systems that are employed together to effectively intercept an incoming missile. Ballistic missile defense is an inherently joint operation that may require the simultaneous involvement of multiple commands and services which operate the system’s elements”(GAO, 2011).

During the disaster/ what to do

Standard guidance on what to do in a nuclear disaster from (Toussaint, 2018), ready.gov, homeland security, FEMA.

  • Distance yourself from the explosion
  • Seeking shelter underground if possible
  • Shield yourself from the fallout
  • Get behind thick walls, concrete, bricks
  • Fallout radiation loses intensity rather quickly
  • First two weeks pose the greatest threat
  • Stay inside for at least 24 hrs, unless otherwise notified by government officials
  • Look away from the flash or fireball, it can blind you.
  • Take cover under anything that may offer protection
  • Lay flat on the ground with your head covered
  • It could take 30 seconds for the blast wave to hit you.
  • Get clean as possible
  • Remove contaminated clothing
  • Outer layer of clothing can remove up to 90% of the radiation.
  • Do not scrub or scratch yourself while showering
  • Use soap but not conditioner, conditioner will trap radiation into your hair.
  • Keep listening to the news and radio.

Limitations

  • The amount of news articles available are limited, due to not having access to local Hawaiian newspapers.

Research Findings

Conclusion

As we found with Hawaii, the citizens were unsure of how to respond to a nuclear attack. The emergency management team also were unprepared to send out a second message to the public and didn’t have proper procedure in place at the time. Right now, Hawaii is unprepared for a nuclear attack, it is important that citizens know what to do and there is a complete all-hazards mitigation plan in place.

References

Ballistic Missiles. (2018). Retrieved February 13, 2018, from https://www.rand.org/topics/ballistic-missiles.html

Bean, H., Liu, B. F., Madden, S., Sutton, J., Wood, M. M., & Mileti, D. S. (2016). Disaster warnings in your pocket: How audiences interpret mobile alerts for an unfamiliar hazard.Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 24(3), 136-147. doi:10.1111/1468-5973.12108

Burchfield, L. A. (2009). Radiation safety : protection and management for homeland security and emergency response. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

Caston, L., Leonard, R. S., & Mouton, C. A. (2014). The future of the u.s. intercontinental ballistic missile force. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

Cova, T. J., Dennison, P. E., Li, D., Drews, F. A., Siebeneck, L. K., & Lindell, M. K. (2016). Warning triggers in environmental hazards: Who should be warned to do what and when?: Warning triggers in environmental hazards. Risk Analysis, 10.1111/risa.12651

Cova, T. J., Drews, F. A., Siebeneck, L. K., & Musters, A. (2009). Protective actions in wildfires: Evacuate or shelter-in-place? Natural Hazards Review, 10(4), 151-162. 10.1061/(ASCE)1527-6988(2009)10:4(151)

Currie, D. (2009). U.S. not fully prepared for nuclear attack. The Nation’s Health, 39(7), 8. Retrieved from http://proxy.library.georgetown.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/198495907?accountid=11091

FEMA, (2008). Local multi-hazard mitigation planning guidance. U.S. Department of Homeland Security (2008 July 1)

Forum, O. M. A. P. H., Board, O. H. S. P., & Institute, O. M. (2013). Nationwide response issues after an improvised nuclear device attack : medical and public health considerations for neighboring jurisdictions: workshop summary. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

Frazier, T. G., Walker, M. H., Kumari, A., & Thompson, C. M. (2013). Opportunities and constraints to hazard mitigation planning. Applied Geography, 40, 52-60. 10.1016/j.apgeog.2013.01.008

Godschalk, D. R. (2003). Urban hazard mitigation: Creating resilient cities. Natural Hazards Review, 4(3), 136-143. 10.1061/(ASCE)1527-6988(2003)4:3(136)

Johnston, R. (2018, March 24). Terrorist attacks and related incidents in the United States. Retrieved from http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/terrorism/wrjp255a.html

Nakaso, D. (2018, Jan 26). ‘Button pusher’ not cooperating with multiple investigations. Honolulu Star – Advertiser Retrieved from http://proxy.library.georgetown.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1991576298?accountid=11091

Nuclear Blast. (n.d.). Retrieved February 13, 2018, from https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-blast

Press, T. A., Honore, M., Grube, N., Teague, C., Eagle, N., Estrellon, A., & Oppegaard, B. (2018, February 06). North Korean Missile Threat. Retrieved February 13, 2018, from http://www.civilbeat.org/topics/north-korean-missile-threat/?gclid=CjwKCAiAk4XUBRB5EiwAHBLUMZABb-uLAmKg9buT9wUBQl1ZHd742VJevMSBaO5sbmDhjDw_kn6qcRoCSCMQAvD_BwE

Quarantelli, E. L. (1997). Ten criteria for evaluating the management of community disasters.Disasters, 21(1), 39-56. 10.1111/1467-7717.00043

Quirk, M. (2009). Review of Nuclear Safeguards, Security and Nonproliferation: Achieving Security with Technology and Policy. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, 6(1), pp. -. Retrieved 12 Feb. 2018, from doi:10.2202/1547-7355.1575

Ripberger, J. T., Silva, C. L., Jenkins‐Smith, H. C., Carlson, D. E., James, M., & Herron, K. G. (2015). False alarms and missed events: The impact and origins of perceived inaccuracy in tornado warning systems. Risk Analysis, 35(1), 44-56. doi:10.1111/risa.12262

Sorensen, J., & Rogers, G. (1988). Local Preparedness for Chemical Accidents: A Survey of U.S. Communities. Industrial Crisis Quarterly, 2(2), 89-108. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu/stable/26162744

Tanimura, K., Ito, H., & Kimura, H. (2013). Nuclear Security and Incident Response. 62. Retrieved February 13, 2018, from http://www.hitachi.com/rev/pdf/2013/r2013_03_106.pdf

Tucker, P. (2018, January 19). What A Nuclear Missile Attack On Hawaii Would Look Like. Retrieved February 13, 2018, from http://www.defenseone.com/threats/2018/01/what-nuclear-missile-attack-hawaii-would-look/145319/

United States. Federal Emergency Management Agency. (2003). Integrating manmade hazards into mitigation planning (Version 2.0. ed.). Washington, D.C.: FEMA, U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security.

United States. Federal Emergency Management Agency. (2008). Local multi-hazard mitigation planning guidance. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, FEMA.

United States. Government Accountability Office. (2010). Information security: National nuclear security administration needs to improve contingency planning for its classified supercomputing operations : Report to congressional requesters. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Govt. Accountability Office.

United States. Government Accountability Office. (2011). Ballistic missile defense: Actions needed to improve training integration and increase transparency of training resources : Report to congressional committees. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Govt. Accountability Office.

Wickens, C. D., Rice, S., Keller, D., Hutchins, S., Hughes, J., & Clayton, K. (2009). False alerts in air traffic control conflict alerting system: Is there a “cry wolf” effect? Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 51(4), 446-462. doi:10.1177/0018720809344720

  • Wong, D. J., Jones, E., & Rubin, G. J. (2018). Mobile text alerts are an effective way of communicating emergency information to adolescents: Results from focus groups with 12‐ to 18‐year‐olds. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 26(1), 183-192. doi:10.1111/1468-5973.12185

platforms. To achieve this goal we present a mechanism that enables fine grain access control on the blog data. Such a mechanism enables user to user interaction to only the selected group of people, only those people can view the blog and comments that are posted on the blog can be controlled by extraction of the information from the blog and checking it with the dictionary of the inappropriate words. If there are any inappropriate comments or hate comments found on the blog by the filter mechanism, the filter mechanism will notify the owner on the blog specifying that there is an inappropriate comment and the blog owner has to decide whether the comment should be posted or not. If there are any particular users who post a lot of inappropriate comments the owner of the blog can ban access for that particular user on the blog and that user will  not be able to comment of the blog.     1.2 Existing System: However, In existing system we don’t have a mechanism to avoid negative comments by the readers of the blog. Any reader who can view the blog can comment on the blog which may go viral on internet. Everything is open for everyone to view the blog which may have some privacy issues. Disadvantages:

  1. As it is Free for all to access the blog there will be privacy issues when the unintended group  of people view it.
  2. As there is no control on the comments by the viewers, the blog writer may face a lot of criticism.
  3. The particular blog cannot be written for a particular user group specific the blog must be related to everyone, so the writer cannot express his views freely.
  4. Negative impact of public when there is no control on spreading hate and criticism.

1.3 Proposed System:

  1. So here we are trying to propose a new system which stops the inappropriate comments made by the readers of the blog.
  2. Only selected group of people which are allowed by the blog writer can view the blogs.
  3.  we propose a semi-automated approach for identifying groups and analyzing their relationships in blogs.
  4. A dictionary is maintained by the admin of the website where he adds the inappropriate words which are stored in a dictionary.
  5. When the viewers comment on the blog system filters the appropriate and inappropriate comments. So, when there is an inappropriate comment the writer of the blog will get notified and if the writer allows it the comment will be posted.
  6. When a writer feels a viewer is spreading too much hate the user can be disallowed from commenting on the blog.

Advantages:

  1. Only specific targeted user group can view the blog and no privacy issues.
  2. All the comments can be filtered automatically or manually so as to minimize inappropriate comments on the blogs.
  3. Restrict access on unwanted user group.
  4. Blocking users who spread a lot of criticism and hate.

                                     2. SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

2.1 H/W System Configuration:-

Processor                             –    Pentium –III

Speed                                  –    1.1 GHz RAM                                    –    256 MB(min) Hard Disk                            –   20 GB Floppy Drive                        –    1.44 MB Key Board                           –    Standard Windows Keyboard Mouse                                 –    Two or Three Button Mouse Monitor                                –    SVGA

2.2 S/W System Configuration:-

Operating System              : Windows95/98/2000/XP Application Server             :   Tomcat8.5 Front End                          :   HTML5, W3.CSS Scripts                               :   JavaScript. Server side Script              :   Java Server Pages. Database                            :   Oracle12c. 2.3 MODULES OF THE SYSTEM

  1. Blog Spider
  2. Information Extraction
  3. Fine gain access control
  4. Visualisation

2.3.1Blog Spider: This module is used to store the blogs in the database and the pages will have the content, title, blog owner info and comments are updated to the blog. The blog spider will get this contents from all the blogs that are created by different communities or people. It gatheres all the content, headers and submit to the extraction module. 2.3.2 Information Extraction: This module processes the blog content and header info which includes owner of the blog, members, comments, status of the members and this module identifies the comments which are automatic or manual for the blog and it gets the data from the database and validate the blog types using filters. Filters will intiligently send the comments to the blogs to be posted or checked with the dictionary of hate words and redirected to the owner of the blogs. So that the owner of the blogs can check the comments that are given by members and can post the comments or reject the comment. 2.3.3 Fine Grain Access Control: This module allows the owner of the blog to restrict the access from the members of his own blog who are posting the hate or un-usual comments on the blogs wall. The owner will have access to access control module so that he can easily restrict the member by changing the status of accessibility. Once he changed the status the restricted member cannot have accessibility to comment on the blog. 2.3.4 Visualization: This module will display the current status of the member of the blog, of any group. The status is presented to the owner of the blog as well as the administrator who is maintaining the whole system.                           3. SYSTEM STUDY  FEASIBILITY STUDY The attainability of the venture is broke down in this stage and business proposition is advanced with an extremely broad arrangement for the venture and some cost gauges. Amid framework investigation the possibility investigation of the proposed framework is to be completed. This is to guarantee that the proposed framework is not a weight to the organization. For attainability examination, some comprehension of the significant necessities for the framework is fundamental. Three key considerations involved in the feasibility analysis are

  1.   ECONOMICAL FEASIBILITY
  2.   TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY
  3.   SOCIAL FEASIBILITY

3.1 ECONOMICAL FEASIBILITY This study is carried out to check the economic impact that the system will have on the organization. The amount of fund that the company can pour into the research and development of the system is limited. The expenditures must be justified. Thus the developed system as well within the budget and this was achieved because most of the technologies used are freely available. Only the customized products had to be purchased. 3.2 TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY This review is completed to check the specialized plausibility, that is, the specialized prerequisites of the framework. Any framework created must not have an appeal on the accessible specialized assets. This will prompt levels of popularity on the accessible specialized assets. This will prompt levels of popularity being put on the customer. The created framework must have an unassuming prerequisite, as just insignificant or invalid changes are required for executing this framework. 3.3 SOCIAL FEASIBILITY The part of study is to check the level of acknowledgment of the framework by the client. This incorporates the way toward preparing the client to utilize the framework effectively. The client must not feel debilitated by the framework, rather should acknowledge it as a need. The level of acknowledgment by the clients exclusively relies on upon the techniques that are utilized to instruct the client about the framework and to make him comfortable with it. His level of certainty must be raised with the goal that he is additionally ready to make some productive feedback, which is invited, as he is the last client of the framework                 4. SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT

4.1 The Java Programming Language

The Java programming language is a high-level language that can be characterized by all of the following buzzwords:

  1. Simple
  2. Architecture neutral
  3. Object oriented
  4. Portable
  5. Distributed
  6. High performance
  7. Interpreted
  8. Multithreaded
  9. Robust
  10. Dynamic
  11. Secure

With most programming dialects, you either order or translate a program so you can run it on your PC. The Java programming dialect is bizarre in that a program is both aggregated and translated. With the compiler, first you make an interpretation of a program into a middle of the road dialect called Java byte codes — the stage free codes translated by the mediator on the Java stage. The mediator parses and runs every Java byte code direction on the PC. Gathering happens just once; understanding happens each time the program is executed. The accompanying figure delineates how this functions. F:\XML-DATABASE SYNCHRONISATION\rendoc\eBooks\The java tutorial\figures\getStarted\g1.gif FIG 4.1.1 JAVA WORKING You can consider Java byte codes as the machine code directions for the Java Virtual Machine (Java VM). Each Java translator, regardless of whether it’s an advancement device or a Web program that can run applets, is a usage of the Java VM. Java byte codes help make “compose once, run anyplace” conceivable. You can incorporate your program into byte codes on any stage that has a Java compiler. The byte codes can then be keep running on any execution of the Java VM. That implies that the length of a PC has a Java VM, a similar program written in the Java programming dialect can keep running on Windows 2000, a Solaris workstation, or on an iMac. F:\XML-DATABASE SYNCHRONISATION\rendoc\eBooks\The java tutorial\figures\getStarted\helloWorld.gif FIG 4.1.2  JAVA ON DIFFERENT OS

4.2 The Java Script

JavaScript (JS) is a dynamic PC programming language.[5] It is most usually utilized as a feature of web programs, whose executions permit customer side scripts to collaborate with the client, control the program, convey nonconcurrently, and modify the report content that is displayed.[5] It is additionally being utilized as a part of server-side programming, diversion advancement and the production of desktop and portable applications. JavaScript is a model based scripting dialect with dynamic writing and has top of the line capacities. Its language structure was affected by C. JavaScript duplicates many names and naming traditions from Java, yet the two dialects are generally random and have altogether different semantics. The key outline standards inside JavaScript are taken from the Self and Scheme programming dialects. It is a multi-worldview dialect, supporting article oriented,[7] basic, and functional] programming styles. The utilization of JavaScript being used outside of website pages—for instance, in PDF records, webpage particular programs, and desktop gadgets—is additionally huge. Fresher and quicker JavaScript VMs and stages based upon them (strikingly Node.js) have additionally expanded the prominence of JavaScript for server-side web applications. On the customer side, JavaScript was generally executed as a translated dialect yet without a moment to spare gathering is currently performed by late (post-2012) browsers.JavaScript was formalized in the ECMAScript dialect standard and is essentially utilized as a component of a web program (customer side JavaScript). This empowers automatic access to computational protests inside a host situation. The most widely recognized utilization of JavaScript is to compose capacities that are installed in or included from HTML pages and that communicate with the Document Object Model (DOM) of the page. Some straightforward cases of this utilization are:Loading new page content or submitting information to the server through AJAX without reloading the page (for instance, an interpersonal organization may enable the client to post notices without leaving the page) Movement of page components, blurring them in and out, resizing them, moving them, etc.Interactive substance, for instance recreations, and playing sound and video Approving info estimations of a web frame to ensure that they are worthy before being submitted to the server.Transmitting data about the client’s perusing propensities and perusing exercises to different sites. Website pages much of the time do this for web investigation, advertisement following, personalization or other purposes.Because JavaScript code can run locally in a client’s program (instead of on a remote server), the program can react to client activities rapidly, making an application more responsive. Besides, JavaScript code can identify client activities which HTML alone can’t, for example, singular keystrokes. Applications, for example, Gmail exploit this: a significant part of the UI rationale is composed in JavaScript, and JavaScript dispatches demands for data, (for example, the substance of an email message) to the server. The more extensive pattern of Ajax programming comparatively misuses this quality. A JavaScript motor (otherwise called JavaScript translator or JavaScript usage) is a mediator that deciphers JavaScript source code and executes the script in like manner. The main JavaScript motor was made by Brendan Eich at Netscape Communications Corporation, for the Netscape Navigator web program. The motor, code-named SpiderMonkey, is actualized in C. It has since been refreshed (in JavaScript 1.5) to fit in with ECMA-262 Edition 3. The Rhino motor, made basically by Norris Boyd (in the past of Netscape; now at Google) is a JavaScript execution in Java. Rhino, as SpiderMonkey, is ECMA-262 Edition 3 consistent. A web program is by a wide margin the most well-known host condition for JavaScript. Web programs regularly make “have items” to speak to the Document Object Model (DOM) in JavaScript. The web server is another normal host condition. A JavaScript webserver would normally uncover have objects speaking to HTTP ask for and reaction objects, which a JavaScript program could then cross examine and control to progressively produce site pages. Since JavaScript is the main dialect that the most well known programs share bolster for, it has turned into an objective dialect for some systems in different dialects, despite the fact that JavaScript was never proposed to be such a language.[53] Despite the execution restrictions inborn to its dynamic nature, the expanding rate of JavaScript motors has made the dialect a shockingly achievable arrangement target. 4.3 JDBC With an end goal to set an autonomous database standard API for Java; Sun Microsystems created Java Database Connectivity, or JDBC. JDBC offers a non specific SQL database get to instrument that gives a reliable interface to an assortment of RDBMSs. This steady interface is accomplished using “module” database network modules, or drivers. On the off chance that a database seller wishes to have JDBC support, he or she should give the driver to every stage that the database and Java keep running on. To pick up a more extensive acknowledgment of JDBC, Sun construct JDBC’s system in light of ODBC. As you found before in this part, ODBC has far reaching support on an assortment of stages. Constructing JDBC in light of ODBC will enable merchants to offer JDBC drivers for sale to the public considerably speedier than building up a totally new availability arrangement. JDBC was declared in March of 1996. It was discharged for a 90 day open survey that finished June 8, 1996. In light of client information, the last JDBC v1.0 determination was discharged before long. The rest of this segment will cover enough data about JDBC for you to comprehend what really matters to it and how to utilize it viably. This is in no way, shape or form an entire diagram of JDBC. That would fill a whole book.  

JDBC Goals

Few programming bundles are planned without objectives at the top of the priority list. JDBC is one that, in view of its numerous objectives, drove the advancement of the API. These objectives, in conjunction with early commentator criticism, have settled the JDBC class library into a strong system for building database applications in Java. The objectives that were set for JDBC are critical. They will give you some knowledge in the matter of why certain classes and functionalities carry on the way they do. The eight plan objectives for JDBC are as per the following:

  1. SQL Level API

       The creators felt that their fundamental objective was to characterize a SQL interface for Java. Despite the fact that not the most reduced database interface level conceivable, it is at a sufficiently low level for more elevated amount instruments and APIs to be made. Then again, it is at a sufficiently high level for application developers to utilize it unhesitatingly. Accomplishing this objective takes into account future instrument merchants to “produce” JDBC code and to conceal a number of JDBC’s complexities from the end client.

  1. SQL Conformance

 SQL language structure shifts as you move from database merchant to database seller. With an end goal to bolster a wide assortment of merchants, JDBC will enable any inquiry articulation to be gone through it to the basic database driver. This enables the availability module to deal with non-standard usefulness in a way that is reasonable for its clients.

  1. JDBC must be implemental on top of common database interfaces The JDBC SQL API must “sit” on top of other basic SQL level APIs. This objective enables JDBC to utilize existing ODBC level drivers by the utilization of a product interface. This interface would make an interpretation of JDBC calls to ODBC and the other way around.
  1. Provide a Java interface that is consistent with the rest of the Java system

As a result of Java’s acknowledgment in the client group up to this point, the planners feel that they ought not stray from the present outline of the center Java framework.

  1. Keep it simple

This objective most likely shows up in all product plan objective postings. JDBC is no special case. Sun felt that the outline of JDBC ought to be exceptionally straightforward, taking into account just a single technique for finishing an assignment for each instrument. Permitting copy usefulness just serves to confound the clients of the API.

  1. Use strong, static typing wherever possible

Solid writing takes into consideration more mistake checking to be done at order time; additionally, less blunder show up at runtime. Keep the common cases simple       Because more often than not, the usual SQL calls used by the programmer are simple SELECT’s, INSERT’s, DELETE’s and UPDATE’s, these queries should be simple to perform with JDBC. However, more complex SQL statements should also be possible. Finally we decided to proceed the implementation using Java Networking..And for      dynamically updating the cache table we go for MS Access database.     Java has two things: a programming language and a platform. Java is a high-level programming language that is all of the following Simple          Architecture-neutral Object-oriented          Portable Distributed           High-performance Interpreted           multithreaded Robust           Dynamic Java is additionally uncommon in that every Java program is both aggregated and deciphered. With an arrange you make an interpretation of a Java program into a middle of the road dialect called Java byte codes the stage free code direction is passed and keep running on the PC. Arrangement happens just once; elucidation happens each time the program is executed. The figure illustrates how this works 

You can consider Java byte codes as the machine code directions for the Java Virtual Machine (Java VM). Each Java translator, regardless of whether it’s a Java improvement instrument or a Web program that can run Java applets, is a usage of the Java VM. The Java VM can likewise be executed in equipment.

Java byte codes help make “compose once, run anyplace” conceivable. You can incorporate your Java program into byte codes on my stage that has a Java compiler. The byte codes can then be run any usage of the Java VM. For instance, a similar Java program can run Windows NT, Solaris, and Macintosh.

4.4 Tomcat 8.5 web server

Tomcat is an open source web server created by Apache Group. Apache Tomcat is the servlet holder that is utilized as a part of the official Reference Implementation for the Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages innovations. The Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages particulars are created by Sun under the Java Community Process. Web Servers like Apache Tomcat bolster just web parts while an application server underpins web segments and in addition business segments (BEAs Weblogic, is one of the prominent application server).To build up a web application with jsp/servlet introduce any web server like JRun, Tomcat and so on to run your application.  FIG 4.6.1 TOMCAT SERVER PAGE     5. CODING INDEX.HTML <html> <head> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=”w3-container w3-display-topright w3-lime w3-round-xxlarge w3-border-top w3-border-bottom” style=”height:30px;margin-right:1cm;display:inline;word-spacing:20px;margin-top:.2cm;”> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Home</a> <a href=”sreg.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Register</a> <a href=”auLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Admin</a> <a href=”userLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium”>UserLogin</a> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container w3-border w3-lime w3-round-large” > <div style=”float:left;border:0px dashed white;width:800px;height:300px;margin-bottom:.1cm;”> <figure> <img class=”w3-center w3-circle w3-display-left” src=”./images/main2.png” style=”margin-left:2cm;width:40%;height:40%;”/> </figure> </div> <div class=”w3-panel w3-green w3-display-right” style=”width:30%;margin-right:2cm;margin-top:1.3cm;border:2px dashed white;”> <p class=”w3-panel w3-white” style=”font-size:13px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’,’curvasive’,’serif’;”> Everyone is free to express their opinions and emotions very easily through blogs. In the blogosphere, many communities have emerged, which include hate groups and racists that are trying to share their ideology, express their views, or recruit new group members. It is important to analyze these virtual communities, defined based on membership and subscription linkages, in order to monitor for activities that are potentially harmful to society.  At the same time, theseopen interfaces pose serious privacy concerns as third party applications are usually givenaccess to the user profiles. Current related research has focused on mainly user-to-userinteractions in social networks, and seems to ignore the third party applications. </p> </div> <div class=”w3-container” > <img src=”./images/social.jpg” style=”height:120px;” class=”w3-circle” /> </div> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> SREG.HTML <html> <head> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } input{ font-size:14px; font-family:cursive; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=”w3-container w3-display-topright w3-lime w3-round-xxlarge w3-border-top w3-border-bottom” style=”height:30px;margin-right:1cm;display:inline;word-spacing:20px;margin-top:.2cm;”> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Home</a> <a href=”sreg.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Register</a> <a href=”auLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Admin</a> <a href=”userLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium”>UserLogin</a> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container w3-border w3-lime w3-round-large” > <div style=”float:left;border:0px dashed white;width:800px;height:300px;margin-bottom:.1cm;”> <figure> <img class=”w3-center w3-circle w3-display-left” src=”./images/main2.png” style=”margin-left:2cm;width:40%;height:40%;”/> </figure> </div> <div class=”w3-panel  w3-display-right” style=”width:32%;margin-right:1cm;margin-top:1.4cm;”> <fieldset style=”height:365px;border:2px dashed white;” class=”w3-cyan”> <legend class=”w3-cyan w3-round-large w3-card-4 w3-text-white”  >USER REG. FORM</legend> <form action=sreg.jsp> <table class=”” style=’color:white;width:330px;’> <tr><th><input type=text name=uid required=required class=”w3-animate-input” placeholder=”User_ID” /></th></tr> <tr><th></th></tr> <tr><th><input type=text name=uname required=required class=”w3-animate-input” placeholder=”UserName”/></th></tr> <tr><th></th><th></th></tr> <tr><th><input type=password name=upwd placeholder=”Password” required=required class=”w3-animate-input”/></th></tr> <tr><th></th><th></th></tr> <tr><th><input type=text name=cont maxlength=10 placeholder=”Contact” required=required class=”w3-animate-input”/></th></tr> <tr><th></th><th></th></tr> <tr><th><input type=email name=email placeholder=”Email_Id” required=required class=”w3-animate-input”/></th></tr> <tr><th></th><th></th></tr> <tr><th><input type=radio name=gen value=’Male’ required=required>Male &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type=radio name=gen value=’Female’>Female &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</th></tr> <tr><th><textarea name=addr placeholder=”Address” rows=5 cols=15 required=required class=”w3-animate-input” style=”font-family:cursive;”></textarea></th></tr> <tr><th></th><th></th></tr> <tr><th><input type=submit name=s value=’Register’>&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type=reset name=s value=’Clear’></th></tr> </table> </form> </fieldset> </div> <div class=”w3-container” > <img src=”./images/social.jpg” style=”height:120px;” class=”w3-circle” /> </div> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed by Vinesh Tatineni & Jahnavi </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> USERLOGIN.JSP <html> <head> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } input{font-size:14px; font-family:cursive; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=”w3-container w3-display-topright w3-lime w3-round-xxlarge w3-border-top w3-border-bottom” style=”height:30px;margin-right:1cm;display:inline;word-spacing:20px;margin-top:.2cm;”> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Home</a> <a href=”sreg.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Register</a> <a href=”auLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Admin</a> <a href=”userLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium”>UserLogin</a> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container w3-border w3-lime w3-round-large” > <div style=”float:left;border:0px dashed white;width:800px;height:300px;margin-bottom:.1cm;”> <figure> <img class=”w3-center w3-circle w3-display-left” src=”./images/main2.png” style=”margin-left:2cm;width:40%;height:40%;”/> </figure> </div> <div class=”w3-panel  w3-display-right” style=”width:32%;margin-right:1cm;margin-top:1.4cm;”> <fieldset class=”w3-cyan w3-text-white w3-border-white” style=’text-align:left; width:250px;border:2px dashed skyblue;margin-right:5cm;background-color:lightyellow;’> <legend class=”w3-card-4 w3-cyan w3-text-white w3-round-large”>USER LOGIN</legend> <form action=’check.jsp’> <p> <input type=text name=usid placeholder=’Enter UserId’ required=required/></p> <p><input type=hidden name=utype value=’user’ /> <input type=password name=uspwd placeholder=’Enter Password’ required=required/></p> <input type=submit name=s value=’Login’ style=’font-size:20px;background-color:skyblue;color:white;’> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type=reset name=r value=’clear’ style=’background-color:skyblue;color:white;’> </form> </fieldset> </div> <div class=”w3-container” > <img src=”./images/social.jpg” style=”height:120px;” class=”w3-circle” /> </div> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> AULOGIN.JSP   <html> <head> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } input{ font-size:14px; font-family:cursive; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=”w3-container w3-display-topright w3-lime w3-round-xxlarge w3-border-top w3-border-bottom” style=”height:30px;margin-right:1cm;display:inline;word-spacing:20px;margin-top:.2cm;”> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Home</a> <a href=”sreg.html” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Register</a> <a href=”auLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium” >Admin</a> <a href=”userLogin.jsp” class=”w3-hover-white w3-medium”>UserLogin</a> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container w3-border w3-lime w3-round-large” > <div style=”float:left;border:0px dashed white;width:800px;height:300px;margin-bottom:.1cm;”> <figure> <img class=”w3-center w3-circle w3-display-left” src=”./images/main2.png” style=”margin-left:2cm;width:40%;height:40%;”/> </figure> </div> <div class=”w3-panel  w3-display-right” style=”width:32%;margin-right:1cm;margin-top:1.4cm;”> <fieldset class=”w3-cyan w3-text-white w3-border-white” style=’text-align:left; width:250px;border:2px dashed skyblue;margin-right:5cm;background-color:lightyellow;’> <legend class=”w3-card-4 w3-cyan w3-text-white w3-round-large”>ADMIN LOGIN</legend> <form action=’check.jsp’> <p> <input type=text name=usid placeholder=’Enter UserId’ required=required/></p> <p><input type=hidden name=utype value=’admin’ /> <input type=password name=uspwd placeholder=’Enter Password’ required=required/></p> <input type=submit name=s value=’Login’ style=’font-size:20px;background-color:skyblue;color:white;’> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type=reset name=r value=’clear’ style=’background-color:skyblue;color:white;’> </form> </fieldset> </div> <div class=”w3-container” > <img src=”./images/social.jpg” style=”height:120px;” class=”w3-circle” /> </div> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div></footer></body></html> USERHOME.JSP <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white w3-round-large “> <a href=”userHomes.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-orange w3-button” >Profile</a> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button w3-blue”>Group</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_grp.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Create</a> <a href=”add_mem.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Add_Members</a> <a href=”vmembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > View</a> </div> </div> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button” >Blog</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_blg.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge ” > NewBlog</a> <a href=”postcomm1.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge” > Comment</a> </div> </div> <a href=”access.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue “>Access</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <!–<div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div>–> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-64 w3-section” > <P CLASS=”w3-padding-64 w3-center w3-jumbo w3-text-white w3-panel w3-blue w3-round-xxlarge”> WELCOME TO USER PANEL </P> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> USERHOMES.JSP <%@ page import=”connection.*,java.sql.*” %> <%! Connection con=null; Statement st=null; ResultSet rs=null; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white w3-round-large “> <a href=”userHomes.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-orange w3-button” >Profile</a> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button w3-blue”>Group</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_grp.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Create</a> <a href=”add_mem.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Add_Members</a> <a href=”vmembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > View</a> </div> </div> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button” >Blog</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_blg.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge ” > NewBlog</a> <a href=”postcomm1.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge” > Comment</a> </div> </div> <a href=”access.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue “>Access</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <!–<div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div>–> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <p class=”w3-panel w3-center w3-underline w3-xlarge w3-style-bold w3-cyan w3-text-white w3-round-xxlarge” > User_Profile </p> <P CLASS=”w3-padding-32 w3-center  w3-text-black w3-panel w3-white w3-round-xxlarge”> <% try{ String uid=(String)session.getAttribute(“slogid”); con=databasecon.getconnection(); st=con.createStatement(); rs=st.executeQuery(“select *from userregn where usrid='”+uid+”‘”); out.println(“<table border=1>”); while(rs.next()) { %><p><label>UserId:&nbsp;&nbsp;</label><span style=’font-family:cursive;font-size:24px;’><%= rs.getString(1) %></span> </p> <p><label>UserName:&nbsp;&nbsp;</label><span style=’font-family:cursive;font-size:24px;’><%= rs.getString(3) %></span> </p> <p><label>Password:&nbsp;&nbsp;</label><span style=’font-family:cursive;font-size:24px;’><%= rs.getString(2) %></span> </p> <p><label>Contact:&nbsp;&nbsp;</label><span style=’font-family:cursive;font-size:24px;’><%= rs.getString(5) %></span> </p> <p><label>Email:&nbsp;&nbsp;</label><span style=’font-family:cursive;font-size:24px;’><%= rs.getString(6) %></span> </p> <p><label>Address:&nbsp;&nbsp;</label><span style=’font-family:cursive;font-size:24px;’><%= rs.getString(4) %></span> </p> <% } out.println(“</table>”); con.close(); } catch(Exception e) { out.println(“Error–>”+e.getMessage()); } %> </P> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> ADD_MEM.JSP <%@ page import=”java.sql.*” %> <%! String tid=””; String tname=””; Connection con=null; ResultSet rs=null; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white w3-round-large “> <a href=”userHomes.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-orange w3-button” >Profile</a> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button w3-blue”>Group</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_grp.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Create</a> <a href=”add_mem.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Add_Members</a> <a href=”vmembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > View</a> </div> </div> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button” >Blog</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_blg.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge ” > NewBlog</a> <a href=”postcomm1.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge” > Comment</a> </div> </div> <a href=”access.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue “>Access</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>Add Members</h3><hr> <% tid=(String)session.getAttribute(“slogid”); Class.forName(“oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver”); con=DriverManager.getConnection(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe”,”comments”,”comments”); Statement stmt=con.createStatement(); rs=stmt.executeQuery(“select * from groups where ownid in(“+ tid+ “)”); out.println(“<form method=post action=’add_mem2.jsp’>”); out.println(“<table align=center class=’w3-table-all w3-centered’><tr><td>Select Group ID</td><td><select name=gid>”); while(rs.next()) { out.println(“<option>” + rs.getString(1) + “</option>”); } rs.close(); out.println(“</select></td></tr>”); rs=stmt.executeQuery(“select * from userregn where usrid <>”+ tid); out.println(“<tr><td>Select User ID</td><td><select name=usid>”); while(rs.next()) { out.println(“<option>” + rs.getString(1) + “</option>”); } out.println(“</select></td></tr>”); out.println(“<tr><td></td><td><input type=submit value=’Add member’></td></tr></table></form>”); rs.close(); con.close(); %> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> VMEMBERS.JSP <%@ page import=”java.sql.*” %> <%! Connection con=null; ResultSet rs=null; String tid=””; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white “> <a href=”vamembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Groups</a> <a href=”vusers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >Users</a> <a href=”addDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Words</a> <a href=”viewDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >ViewWords</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <!–<div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div>–> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>VIEW GROUP MEMBERS</h3><hr> <% //try //{ tid=(String)session.getAttribute(“slogid”); Class.forName(“oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver”); con=DriverManager.getConnection(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe”,”comments”,”comments”); Statement stmt=con.createStatement(); rs=stmt.executeQuery(“select * from groups”); out.println(“<form method=post action=’vamembers2.jsp’>”); out.println(“<table class=’w3-table-all w3-centered’ align=center><tr><td>Group ID</td><td><select name=gid style=’width:130px;’>”); while(rs.next()) { out.println(“<option>” + rs.getString(1) + “</option>”); } rs.close(); out.println(“</select></td></tr>”); out.println(“<tr><td></td><td><input type=submit value=’Show Members’></td></tr></table></form>”); con.close(); %> </P> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> ADD_BLG.JSP %@ page import=”java.sql.*” %> <%! String btitle,bcomm; Connection con=null; Statement stmt1=null; ResultSet rs; String usid=””; int slno=1; int tid=0; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white w3-round-large “> <a href=”userHomes.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-orange w3-button” >Profile</a> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button w3-blue”>Group</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_grp.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Create</a> <a href=”add_mem.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Add_Members</a> <a href=”vmembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > View</a> </div> </div> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button” >Blog</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_blg.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge ” > NewBlog</a> <a href=”postcomm1.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge” > Comment</a> </div> </div> <a href=”access.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue “>Access</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>New Blog</h3><hr> <% usid=(String)session.getAttribute(“slogid”); out.println(“<form method=post action=’add_blog.jsp’ class=’w3-panel’>”); out.println(“<table class=’w3-container’ align=center>”); out.println(“<tr><td>Blog Title</td><td><input type=text name=btitle size=15 required=required></td></tr>”); out.println(“<tr><td>Blog Info</td><td><textarea name=bcomm rows=10 cols=50 required=required></textarea></td></tr>”); try { Class.forName(“oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver”); con=DriverManager.getConnection(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe”,”comments”,”comments”); stmt1=con.createStatement(); out.println(“<tr><td>Group ID</td><td><select name=gid required=required>”); rs=stmt1.executeQuery(“select gid from groups where ownid=” + usid); while(rs.next()) { out.println(“<option>” + rs.getString(1) + “</option>”); } out.println(“</select></td></tr>”); out.println(“<tr><td></td></tr>”); out.println(“<tr><td>Filter Mode</td><td><input type=radio name=fmode value=’Manual’ checked> Manual <input type=radio name=fmode value=’Automatic’> Automatic</td></tr>”); rs.close(); } catch(Exception ee) { out.println(“<b>Group with this ID already Exists!”); } con.close(); out.println(“<tr><td></td><td><input type=submit value=’Save’><input type=reset></td></tr>”); out.println(“</table></form>”); out.println(“</html>”); %> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> ACCESS.JSP <%@ page import=”java.sql.*” %> <%! String tid=””; String tname=””; Connection con=null; ResultSet rs=null; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white w3-round-large “> <a href=”userHomes.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-orange w3-button” >Profile</a> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button w3-blue”>Group</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_grp.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Create</a> <a href=”add_mem.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > Add_Members</a> <a href=”vmembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge w3-hover-blue” > View</a> </div> </div> <div class=”w3-dropdown-hover”> <button class=”w3-button” >Blog</button> <div class=”w3-dropdown-content w3-bar-block w3-card-4″> <a href=”add_blg.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge ” > NewBlog</a> <a href=”postcomm1.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-round-xlarge” > Comment</a> </div> </div> <a href=”access.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue “>Access</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>ACCESS CONTROL MEMBERS</h3><hr> <% tid=(String)session.getAttribute(“slogid”); Class.forName(“oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver”); con=DriverManager.getConnection(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe”,”comments”,”comments”); Statement stmt=con.createStatement(); rs=stmt.executeQuery(“select * from groups where ownid in(“+ tid+ “)”); out.println(“<form method=post action=’acess2.jsp’>”); out.println(“<table ALIGN=CENTER class=’w3-table-all w3-centered’><tr><td>Group ID</td><td><select name=gid style=’width:120px;’>”); while(rs.next()) {out.println(“<option>” + rs.getString(1) + “</option>”); } rs.close(); out.println(“</select></td></tr>”); out.println(“<tr><td></td><td><input type=submit value=’View Members’></td></tr></table></form>”); rs.close(); con.close(); %> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> VUSERS.JSP <%@ page import=”java.sql.*” %> <%! Connection con=null; ResultSet rs=null; String tid=””; String tgid=””; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white “> <a href=”vamembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Groups</a> <a href=”vusers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >Users</a> <a href=”addDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue ” >Words</a> <a href=”viewDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >ViewWords</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <!–<div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div>–> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>VIEW USERS</h3><hr> <% try { Class.forName(“oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver”); con=DriverManager.getConnection(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe”,”comments”,”comments”); Statement stmt=con.createStatement(); rs=stmt.executeQuery(“select members.usrid,uname,status,members.gid from members,userregn where members.usrid=userregn.usrid order by members.usrid”); out.println(“<table border CLASS=’W3-TABLE-ALL W3-CENTERED’ >”); out.println(“<tr CLASS=’W3-BLUE’><td><b>User ID</td><td><b>User Name</td><td><b>Blog Status</td><td><b>Group ID</td></tr>”); while(rs.next()) { out.println(“<tr><td>” + rs.getString(1) + “</td><td>” + rs.getString(2) + “</td>”); if(rs.getString(3).equals(“Allow”)) out.println(“<td><img src=’./images/allow.png’ width=80 height=80 /></td>”); else out.println(“<td><img src=’./images/restrict.png’ width=80 height=80 /></td>”); out.println(“<td>” + rs.getString(4) + “</td></tr>”); } rs.close(); out.println(“</table>”); con.close(); } catch(Exception ee) { out.println(“<b>” + ee.getMessage()); } %> </P> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> ADDDICT.JSP <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white “> <a href=”vamembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Groups</a> <a href=”vusers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >Users</a> <a href=”addDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Words</a> <a href=”viewDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >ViewWords</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>Add Words</h3><hr> <form method=post action=’addDict2.jsp’ > <table class=” w3-center” align=center border=0> <tr><td><input type=text name=word size=15 class=”w3-input w3-animate-input” style=”30%” placeholder=”New Word” required=required></td></tr> <tr><td><br></td></tr> <tr><td><br></td></tr> <tr><td><input type=submit value=’Save’>&nbsp;<input type=reset></td></tr> </table></form> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html> VIEWDICT.JSP <%@ page import=”java.sql.*” %> <%! Connection con=null; ResultSet rs=null; String tid=””; String tgid=””; %> <html> <head> <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1″> <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”w3.css” /> </head> <style> nav{ font-family: “Comic Sans MS”, cursive, sans-serif; } </style> <body class=”w3-container”> <nav class=” w3-container w3-display-topmiddle”> <div class=”w3-bar w3-white “> <a href=”vamembers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Groups</a> <a href=”vusers.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >Users</a> <a href=”addDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-blue” >Words</a> <a href=”viewDict.jsp” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button ” >ViewWords</a> <a href=”index.html” class=”w3-bar-item w3-button w3-orange “>Logout</a> </div> </nav> <header class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-border w3-round-xlarge” style=”height:120px;” > <div style=”float:left;”> <img src=”./images/logo.jpg” class=”w3-round-xxlarge” /> </div> <!–<div style=”float:left;width:200px;height:200px;margin-left:2cm;”> <img src=”./images/C1.png” style=”width:820px;height:100px;margin-top:.01cm;” class=”w3-round-xlarge” /> </div>–> </header> <section class=” w3-container  w3-border  w3-round-large w3-padding-16 w3-section” > <h3 class=”w3-panel w3-blue w3-center w3-round-xxlarge”>DICTIONARY</h3><hr> <% try { Class.forName(“oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver”); con=DriverManager.getConnection(“jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe”,”comments”,”comments”); Statement stmt=con.createStatement(); rs=stmt.executeQuery(“select * from dict”); out.println(“<table border CLASS=’W3-TABLE-ALL W3-CENTERED’ >”); while(rs.next()) { out.println(“<tr><td>” + rs.getString(1) + “</td></tr>”); } rs.close(); out.println(“</table>”); con.close(); } catch(Exception ee) { out.println(“<b>” + ee.getMessage()); } %> </P> </section> <footer class=”w3-container w3-cyan w3-round-xxlarge” style=””> <div class=” w3-width-300 w3-round-large w3-hover-white w3-text-hover-blue w3-center”> <span style=”font-size:18px;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;color:white;margin-top:1cm;”> Developed at Adroit Info com India Pvt Ltd. </span> </div> </footer> </body> </html>                                   6. SYSTEM DESIGN 6.1 INPUT DESIGN The info configuration is the connection between the data framework and the client. It includes the creating particular and methods for information planning and those means are important to put exchange information into a usable shape for preparing can be accomplished by assessing the PC to peruse information from a composed or printed record or it can happen by having individuals entering the information specifically into the framework. The plan of information concentrates on controlling the measure of info required, controlling the blunders, evading delay, maintaining a strategic distance from additional means and keeping the procedure straightforward. The information is outlined in such a path along these lines, to the point that it gives security and convenience with holding the protection. Input Design considered the following things:

  • What data should be given as input?
  •  How the data should be arranged or coded?
  •  The dialog to guide the operating personnel in providing input.
  • Methods for preparing input validations and steps to follow when error occur.

OBJECTIVES 1. Input Design is the way toward changing over a client arranged portrayal of the contribution to a PC based framework. This plan is imperative to maintain a strategic distance from blunders in the information input process and demonstrate the right bearing to the administration for getting right data from the mechanized framework. 2. It is accomplished by making easy to use screens for the information passage to deal with expansive volume of information. The objective of planning info is to make information passage less demanding and to be free from blunders. The information section screen is planned such that every one of the information controls can be performed. It additionally gives record seeing offices. 3. At the point when the information is entered it will check for its legitimacy. Information can be entered with the assistance of screens. Suitable messages are given as when required so that the client won’t be in maize of moment. Accordingly the target of information configuration is to make an info design that is anything but difficult to take after 6.2 OUTPUT DESIGN A quality output is one, which meets the requirements of the end user and presents the information clearly. In any system results of processing are communicated to the users and to other system through outputs. In output design it is determined how the information is to be displaced for immediate need and also the hard copy output. It is the most important and direct source information to the user. Efficient and intelligent output design improves the system’s relationship to help user decision-making. 1. Designing computer output should proceed in an organized, well thought out manner; the right output must be developed while ensuring that each output element is designed so that people will find the system can use easily and effectively. When analysis design computer output, they should Identify the specific output that is needed to meet the requirements. 2. Select methods for presenting information. 3. Create document, report, or other formats that contain information produced by the system. The output form of an information system should accomplish one or more of the following objectives.

  • Convey information about past activities, current status or projections of the
  • Future.
  • Signal important events, opportunities, problems, or warnings.
  • Trigger an action.
  • Confirm an action.
  1.  SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE

   FIG 6.3.1 ARCHITECTURE OF SYSTEM The above diagram shows the architecture of our project Organizing User Search Histories. It shows how our system is designed and shows the flow among various elements throughout the system in an abstract view. 6.4 UML Concepts The Unified Modelling Language (UML) is a standard language for writing software blue prints. The UML is a language for

  • Visualizing
  • Specifying
  • Constructing
  • Documenting the artefacts of a software intensive system.

The UML is a dialect which gives vocabulary and the tenets to consolidating words in that vocabulary with the end goal of correspondence. A displaying dialect is a dialect whose vocabulary and the guidelines concentrate on the concesptual and physical portrayal of a framework. Displaying yields a comprehension of a framework. 6.4.1 Building Blocks of the UML The vocabulary of the UML encompasses three kinds of building blocks:

  • Things
  • Relationships
  • Diagrams

Things are the abstractions that are first-class citizens in a model; relationships tie these things together; diagrams group interesting collections of things. 1. Things in the UML There are four kinds of things in the UML:

  • Structural things
  • Behavioral things
  • Grouping things
  • Annotational things

  Structural things are the nouns of UML models. The structural things used in the project design are: First, a class is a description of a set of objects that share the same attributes, operations, relationships and semantics.

Window
Origin Size
open() close() move() display()

         

Fig: Classes

Second, a use case is a description of set of sequence of actions that a system performs that yields an observable result of value to particular actor.  Fig: Use Cases Third, a node is a physical element that exists at runtime and represents a computational resource, generally having at least some memory and often processing capability.  Fig: Nodes Behavioral things are the dynamic parts of UML models. The behavioral thing used is: Interaction: An interaction is a behaviour that comprises a set of messages exchanged among a set of objects within a particular context to accomplish a specific purpose. An interaction involves a number of other elements, including messages, action sequences (the behaviour invoked by a message, and links (the connection between objects).  Fig: Messages 2. Relationships in the UML: There are four kinds of relationships in the UML:

  • Dependency
  • Association
  • Generalization
  • Realization

dependency is a semantic relationship between two things in which a change to one thing may affect the semantics of the other thing (the dependent thing).  Fig: Dependencies An association is a structural relationship that describes a set links, a link being a connection among objects. Aggregation is a special kind of association, representing a structural relationship between a whole and its parts.  Fig: Association A generalization is a specialization/ generalization relationship in which objects of the specialized element (the child) are substitutable for objects of the generalized element (the parent).  Fig: Generalization A realization is a semantic relationship between classifiers, where in one classifier specifies a contract that another classifier guarantees to carry out.  Fig: Realization                           6.4.2 UML DIAGRAMS: 1. USE CASE Diagram thumbnail_use case.jpg FIG 6.4.2.1 USE CASE DIAGRAM The above diagram is Use Case diagram of our system. It shows the set of actions performed by 2 types of users. In our system we have 2 types of users. They are Administrator  and  User . As described earlier, the content in the Ovals are actions performed in the system and those actors are like symbols represent users in system. Those dashed lines from user to action means users are performing those actions respectively.     2. SEQUENCE Diagram  FIG 6.4.2.2 SEQUENCE DIAGRAM The above diagram Show sequence diagram for admin and user. It represents sequence or flow of messages in system among various objects of the system in user’s life time as well as admin’s life time. The rectangle boxes at top represent objects that are invoked by unregistered user and the dashed lines dropping from those boxes are life lines which shows existence of the object up to what time. The boxes on the dashed lines are events and the lines connecting them represent messages and their flow. 3. CLASS DIAGRAM thumbnail_class.jpg FIG 6.4.2.6 CLASS DIAGRAM The above diagram represents class diagram of our system i.e., it shows various classes used in our system and the relationship with one class to other in the system. Each rectangle box represents a class and the upper portion of it represents class name and middle portion represents attributes of the class and the lower represents the functions performed by that class. 4. ACTIVITY DIAGRAM  FIG 6.4.2.8 ACTIVITY DIAGRAM The above diagram represents activity diagram of the system i.e., it represents the flow of activities in our project Organized User Search Histories. Dot at the start represents starting and dot with circle represents ending and an activity is represented as curve sided rectangle. On seeing it we can understand the flow activities that has to be gone from start to end        

  1. ER DIAGRAM

   An entity-relationship diagram (ERD) is a data modeling technique that graphically illustrates an information system’s entities and the relationships between those entities. An ERD is a conceptual and representational model of data used to represent the entity framework infrastructure. There are three types of ER diagrams one to one , one to many, many to many. In ER diagram boxes represent entities, diamonds represent relationships, circles represent attributes.             7. SYSTEM TESTING The reason for testing is to find mistakes. Testing is the way toward attempting to find each possible blame or shortcoming in a work item. It gives an approach to check the usefulness of segments, sub-gatherings, congregations or potentially a completed item It is the way toward practicing programming with the purpose of guaranteeing that the Software framework lives up to its necessities and client desires and does not flop in an inadmissible way. There are different sorts of test. Each test sort addresses a particular testing prerequisite. 7.1 TYPES OF TESTS 1. Unit testing Unit testing includes the plan of experiments that approve that the inside program rationale is working appropriately, and that program inputs deliver substantial yields. All choice branches and inside code stream ought to be approved. It is the trying of individual programming units of the application .it is done after the consummation of an individual unit before combination. This is an auxiliary testing, that depends on learning of its development and is intrusive. Unit tests perform essential tests at segment level and test a particular business process, application, as well as framework design. Unit tests guarantee that every one of a kind way of a business procedure performs precisely to the recorded determinations and contains unmistakably characterized inputs and expected outcomes. 2. Incorporation testing Combination tests are intended to test incorporated programming parts to decide whether they really keep running as one program. Testing is occasion driven and is more worried with the essential result of screens or fields. Joining tests exhibit that in spite of the fact that the segments were separately fulfillment, as appeared by effectively unit testing, the mix of segments is right and predictable. Joining testing is particularly gone for uncovering the issues that emerge from the mix of segments. 3Functional test Functional tests provide systematic demonstrations that functions tested are available as specified by the business and technical requirements, system documentation, and user manuals. Functional testing is centered on the following items:

  • Valid Input               :  identified classes of valid input must be accepted.
  • Invalid Input             : identified classes of invalid input must be rejected.
  • Functions                  : identified functions must be exercised.
  • Output                      : identified classes of application outputs must be exercised.
  • Systems/Procedures: interfacing systems or procedures must be invoked.

Organization and preparation of functional tests is focused on requirements, key functions, or special test cases. In addition, systematic coverage pertaining to identify Business process flows; data fields, predefined processes, and successive processes must be considered for testing. Before functional testing is complete, additional tests are identified and the effective value of current tests is determined. 4. Framework Test Framework testing guarantees that the whole incorporated programming framework meets prerequisites. It tests an arrangement to guarantee known and unsurprising outcomes. A case of framework testing is the design situated framework joining test. Framework testing depends on process portrayals and streams, underscoring pre-driven process connections and joining focuses. 5. White Box Testing White Box Testing is a trying in which in which the product analyzer knows about the inward workings, structure and dialect of the product, or if nothing else its motivation. It is reason. It is utilized to test ranges that can’t be come to from a discovery level. 6. Discovery Testing Discovery Testing will be trying the product with no learning of the internal workings, structure or dialect of the module being tried. Discovery tests, as most different sorts of tests, must be composed from a conclusive source archive, for example, determination or necessities report, for example, detail or prerequisites record. It is a trying in which the product under test is dealt with, as a discovery .you can’t “see” into it. The test gives data sources and reacts to yields without considering how the product functions. 7.2 Unit Testing: Unit testing is usually conducted as part of a combined code and unit test phase of the software lifecycle, although it is not uncommon for coding and unit testing to be conducted as two distinct phases. Test strategy and approach Field testing will be performed manually and functional tests will be written in detail. Test objectives • All field entries must work properly. • Pages must be activated from the identified link. • The entry screen, messages and responses must not be delayed. Features to be tested • Verify that the entries are of the correct format • No duplicate entries should be allowed • All links should take the user to the correct page.   7.3 Integration Testing Programming coordination testing is the incremental reconciliation testing of at least two incorporated programming parts on a solitary stage to create disappointments brought about by interface surrenders. The assignment of the mix test is to watch that segments or programming applications, e.g. segments in a product framework or – one stage up – programming applications at the organization level – associate without mistake. Test Results: All the experiments said above passed effectively. No deformities experienced. 7.4 Acceptance Testing Client Acceptance Testing is a basic period of any venture and requires noteworthy cooperation by the end client. It likewise guarantees that the framework meets the useful necessities. Test Results: All the experiments said above passed effectively. No imperfections experienced.                     8. OUTPUT SCREENS  FIG 8.1 MAIN HOME PAGE This is the main home page where a guest has to select category, sub-category and enter query and press submit. The reset button is to clear all the text fields  FIG 8.2 GUEST SEARCH RESULT On pressing submit the above page appears, which shows the results  FIG 8.3 GUEST SEARCH HISTORY Guest on clicking view history the above page will be displayed  FIG 8.4 USER REGISTRATION PAGE For a guest to get registered, he should provide his credentials and click submit. If any field is left empty or characters are missing-it will return alert message  FIG 8.5 REGISTERED USER LOGIN PAGE After registration user will have a unique name and password. To login to his account he should enter in the above page  FIG 8.6 REGISTERED USER HOME PAGE This is the home page for registered user where he can search data, view history and change details.  FIG 8.7 REGISTERED USER SEARCH RESULTS On searching any query the above page will be displayed  FIG 8.8 REGISTERED USER HISTORY On clicking view history, the above page will be displayed. A user can also view history for a particular date if he wants.  FIG 8.9 REGISTERED USER SEARCHING THROUGH DATE Here the user enters the date and all the history associated with it are displayed  FIG 8.10 ADMIN LOGIN PAGE This is admin login page. In this admin logins with his unique ID.  FIG 8.11 ADMIN HOME PAGE Home page for admin; where he can add data, see user details, change password.  FIG 8.12 ADMIN ADDING FINANCIAL DETAILS Admin has to select category, sub-category, title and add description. This can be viewed by the registered and unregistered users  FIG 8.13 ADMIN ADDING TRAVEL DETAILS Admin has to select category, sub-category, title and add description. This can be viewed by the registered and unregistered users  FIG 8.14 ADMIN SEEING USER DETAILS Admin can know which users are registered to this site as well as he can see all the details of registered users  FIG 8.15 ADMIN CHANGING HIS PASSWORD PAGE For enhance security, Admin can change his password  FIG 8.16 ADMIN VIEWING GROUPS By selecting the query group; admin can see what all (the data) he add in different sub-categories  FIG 8.17 ADMIN VIEWING GROUPS RESULT After Clicking submit query, all the results associated to a particular query are displayed in above page                     9. CONCLUSION The query reformulation and click graphs contain useful information on user behavior when searching online. In this paper, we show how such information can be used effectively for the task of organizing user search histories into query groups. More specifically, we propose combining the two graphs into a query fusion graph. We further show that our approach that is based on probabilistic random walks over the query fusion graph outperforms time-based and keyword similarity based approaches. We also find value in combining our method with keyword similarity-based methods, especially when there is insufficient usage information about the queries. As future work, we intend to investigate the usefulness of the knowledge gained from these query groups in various applications such as providing query suggestions and biasing the ranking of search results. 10. BIBLIOGRAPHY  References Made From:

  1.  Accoria. Rock web server and load balancer. http://www.accoria.com.
  2. Amazon Web Services. Amazon Web Services (AWS). http://aws.amazon.com
  3. V. Cardellini, M. Colajanni, and P. S. Yu. Dynamic load balancing on web-server systems. IEEE Internet Computing, 3(3):28{39, 1999.
  4. L. Cherkasova. FLEX: Load Balancing and Management Strategy for Scalable Web Hosting Service. IEEE Symposium on Computers and Communications, 0:8, 2000.
  5.  F5 Networks. F5 Networks. http://www.f5.com.
  6.  R. Fielding, J. Gettys, J. Mogul, H. Frystyk, L. Masinter, P. Leach, and T. Berners-Lee. Hypertext transfer protocol { http/1.1. In IETF RFC 2616, 1999.
  7. Google Inc. Google App Engine. http://code.google.com/appengine/.
  8. HaProxy. HaProxy load balancer. http://haproxy.1wt.eu/.
  9. G. Hunt, E. Nahum, and J. Tracey. Enabling content-based load distribution for scalable services. Technical report, 1997.
  10. E. Katz, M. Butler, and R. McGrath. A scalable HTTP server: The NCSA prototype. In Proc. First International Conference on the World Wide Web, Apr. 1994.

Sites Referred: http://java.sun.com http://www.sourcefordgde.com http://www.networkcomputing.com/ http://www.roseindia.com/



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